CQC Inspections and Reports in West Berkshire

PENDING INSPECTIONS

The Cloisters

The Cloisters

The Cloisters was registered in September 2016, is run by Priory Rehabilitation Services Limited and has not yet been inspected by the CQC.  If you have any feedback, please contact us at contact@healthwatchwestberks.org.uk

LATEST REPORTS

Please see latest reports from inspections carried out by the CQC in the West Berkshire area:-

14 July 2017 Rowan Cottage – Outstanding

“Rowan Cottage is a residential care home providing care and accommodation for up to nine people with a learning disability or autistic spectrum disorder. It is a single storey building with an annexe and an enclosed garden. At the time of the inspection there were nine people living at the service, eight in the main house and one in the self-contained annexe.

The service is required to have a registered manager. There was a registered manager in post who had been registered to manage the service since July 2016. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

This was an unannounced comprehensive inspection which took place on 10 May 2017. We were assisted by the registered manager during the inspection.

People were safe at Rowan Cottage. They were encouraged and supported to learn about how to keep themselves safe and raise any concerns or worries they may have. People were protected from harm and abuse by staff who had been trained and had knowledge of how to safeguard people. Staff understood their responsibilities to report and act on issues if they arose. Risks were assessed, managed and reviewed to keep people safe. There were sufficient staff who had been recruited using effective procedures to ensure their suitability. Medicines were managed and administered safely. Routine health and safety checks were completed in accordance with legislation and guidance. Infection control procedures were followed.

Staff were praised by people for providing effective support. Staff were trained in areas relevant to their job role and their skills assessed and monitored. They were supported by the management team to develop and gain appropriate qualifications. Staff felt supported and received regular supervision and appraisal of their work. The provider was meeting the requirements of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and the associated Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards. Consent to care and support was sought in line with legislation and guidance. When appropriate mental capacity assessments had been completed and where people had been assessed as not having mental capacity to make a decision, a best interests meeting had taken place. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.”

 

To read further information about this inspection, please click HERE

20th June St. Anne’s Opportunity Centre Limited

“Chaffinches is a care home without nursing that provides a service to up to three people with learning disabilities and/or autistic spectrum disorder. At the time of our inspection there were three people living at the service.
 
At the last inspection, the service was rated Good. At this inspection we found the service remained Good and had continued to meet all the fundamental standards of quality and safety.
 
Why the service remained Good:
Staff had a good understanding of how to keep people safe and protect them from abuse. Personal and environmental risks to the safety of people, staff and visitors had been assessed and plans were in place to minimise those risks. Recruitment processes were in place to make sure, as far as possible, that people were protected from staff being employed who were not suitable. There were sufficient numbers of staff and medicines were stored and handled correctly”
To read the full report click HERE

26th June P & M Homecare Limited

“This was an announced inspection which took place on 23 and 24 May 2017. Bluebird Care (Newbury) is a domiciliary care service which is registered to provide personal care to people living in their own homes. The service re-registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) in June 2016 after a change of address. The service currently provides personal care to 51 people who live in the Newbury and West Berkshire area. Most people offered a service are self-funding (pay for their own care).

There is a registered manager running the service. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated regulations about how the service is run.
 
People were kept as safe as possible by staff who had been appropriately trained and knew how to protect people in their care. Care staff were recruited via robust recruitment processes to ensure they were suitable to provide safe care to people. General risks and risks to individuals were identified and action was taken to reduce them. People were supported to take their medicines safely, at the right times and in the right amounts by trained and competent staff.”
To read the full report then click HERE

26th June Dimensions (UK) Limited

“Dimensions Baily Thomas House Haysoms Drive is a respite service for up to six people at a time with a learning disability. People may have associated physical or behavioural difficulties. The service supports a total of 50 people through planned and agreed respite stays.

Rating at last inspection: At the last inspection in October 2014, the service was rated Good.
At this inspection we found the service remained Good.
 
Why the service is rated Good?
 
The service met relevant fundamental standards. People felt safe and well cared for by staff. Where risks were identified, appropriate steps had been taken to minimise these. Medicines were managed so as to reduce the risk of errors, given the frequency of their transfer between people’s homes and the service. Potential new staff were subject to a robust recruitment process. Once appointed, staff received a thorough induction and training to equip them with the necessary knowledge and skills and were provided with ongoing support and development opportunities.”
To read the full report click HERE

1st June Thatcham court care home

“This inspection took place on 27 and 28 April 2017. The inspection was unannounced on the first day and announced on the second. The previous comprehensive inspection of the service was in May 2016. At that inspection we found the service was in breach of one regulation of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014.

A requirement notice was issued with respect to the breach of Regulation 12 (Safe care and treatment). The registered provider sent us an action plan in June 2016 outlining the improvements they were going to make in order to meet the requirements of the regulation.
The inspection of 27 and 28 April 2017 was a comprehensive inspection to follow up and ensure the requirement notice for Regulation 12 (Safe care and treatment) had been met and to make a judgement about the overall compliance of the service. We found the service had made the necessary improvements to meet the requirements of the regulations.
Thatcham Court Care Home provides accommodation for up to 60 people who may be living with dementia and need personal and nursing care. The service was purpose built as a care home and provides accommodation over three floors. There is a well maintained garden which provides safe outdoor space for people to enjoy.”
To read the full report click HERE.

15th June – Birchwood Road

“This inspection took place on 8 and 9 May 2017. This was a focused responsive inspection, to concerns that had been raised through a recent safeguarding referral to the local authority.
The home had a registered manager who had been in post since July 2016. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.
Birchwood – Newbury is a care home with nursing that is registered to provide support to a total of 60 people across three floors. At the time of the inspection, we were advised that the ground floor had been closed, to allow staff to be deployed to the other two floors. A total of 46 people were being provided support and care at the service.
Staff knew how to keep people safe by reporting concerns immediately. Systems and processes were in place to recruit staff who were suitable to work in the service and to protect people against the risk of abuse. However, the service required using agency staff as there were a number of vacancies within the service. This ensured sufficient staff were deployed to keep people safe.”

To read the full report click HERE

31 May 2017- Walnut Close Care Home rated ‘GOOD’ in latest CQC report

31 May 2017

Walnut Close provides support and personal care to up to 35 people in total, with needs arising from old age. Up to eleven people living with dementia are supported in a separate specialist unit. The service does not provide nursing care.

Rating at last inspection.

At the last inspection in November 2014, the service was rated Good.

Rating at this inspection.

At this inspection we found the service remained Good.

Why the service is rated Good.

The service had continued to develop and improve, particularly in terms of the developments in the dementia unit, which had been prioritised recently. The improvements made and planned there had significantly enhanced the experience of those living with dementia, and a range of further developments were in process.

People felt safe and well cared for and said staff were kind and attentive to their needs. Feedback from the local authority was positive and the service had worked with them to improve some records and systems. A local authority representative commented, “The staff are very person centred and from my experience during my visits are very supportive and kind to the residents.” Regarding the management of the service they said, “Management are very proactive and transparent.”

People were kept as safe as possible by the systems, policies, procedures and the training provided to staff. Health and safety and other risks were well managed.

People’s safety and wellbeing were enhanced by the changes in staffing, including additional staff at key times, piloting qualified shift leaders on night shifts and increasing management cover at weekends. The appointment of ‘champions’ in key areas also helped to drive further developments in the service.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

Induction improvements and an effective ongoing training programme helped ensure staff had the up to date knowledge and skills to deliver person centred care. The registered manager had taken steps to improve the frequency of ongoing staff support through supervision and had ensured staff development was encouraged through annual appraisals.

People continued to receive effective healthcare support and the service worked well with external healthcare providers. Where issues had been identified with the quality of food provided, the registered manager had taken steps to address these with the external caterers and had achieved improvements.

Staff delivered support calmly and in a timely way. They respected people’s dignity, individuality and cultural or personal needs. There was a positive rapport between people and staff. The service continued to respond promptly to people’s changing needs, feedback and complaints. Ongoing improvements had been made in the variety and individualisation of activities.

The service was well led by a competent registered manager who sought to involve people and staff in plans for future developments. The view of people, staff and external professionals had been sought and identified issues acted upon.

Read full report here.

What are your experiences receiving acute hospital care living in West Berkshire? Let us know here, on facebook, twitter, email, or call us on 01635886210.

12 May 2017- Theale Medical Centre ‘requires improvement’ in latest CQC inspection

12 May 2017

Chief Inspector of General Practice

We carried out a short notice announced comprehensive inspection at Theale Medical Centre on 15 and 24 March 2017. We rated the practice as good for providing Effective, Caring and Responsive services and requires improvement for Safe and Well Led. Overall the practice is rated as requires improvement.

Our key findings across all the areas we inspected were as follows:

  • Risks to patients were assessed and well managed, with the exception of those relating to recruitment checks and dispensary processes.
  • There was a leadership structure but not all staff felt supported by management. The practice sought feedback from patients, which it acted on.
  • Governance arrangements in respect to documentation and record keeping for organisational management were not always effective.
  • Staff were aware of current evidence-based guidance. Most staff had been trained to provide them with the skills and knowledge to deliver effective care and treatment. However, mental capacity act training was not offered to staff.
  • Information about services and how to complain was available. Improvements were made to the quality of care as a result of complaints and concerns. However, governance arrangements had not included logging all verbal complaints and staff told us many of these had been dealt with ineffectively or not responded to in a timely way.
  • Feedback from patients reported that access to a named GP and continuity of care was not always available quickly, although urgent appointments were usually available the same day.
  • Results from the national GP patient survey showed most patients were treated with compassion, dignity and respect and were involved in their care and decisions about their treatment.
  • The practice had good facilities and was well equipped to treat patients and meet their needs.
  • There was an open and transparent approach to safety and a system in place for reporting and recording significant events.
  • The provider was aware of the requirements of the duty of candour. Examples we reviewed showed the practice complied with these requirements.

The areas where the provider must make improvement are:

  • The provider must ensure governance processes and systems are consistently applied in a timely manner to assess, monitor and improve the quality and safety of the services provided and in the management of risk. This includes ensuring that:
  • All staff are aware of policies and procedures and are effectively embedded in practice. For example, not all staff were aware of the whistleblowing policy and how to access it.
  • Governance arrangements include all necessary employment checks; training needs are met for all staff; dispensary governance processes identify risks and keep patients safe.
  • The complaints management processes include documenting and responding to all verbal complaints in a timely way. Learning and trends from complaints must be shared with all staff.

The areas where the provider should make improvements are:

  • Ensure all actions from the infection control audit have been documented.
  • Continue to review the learning disability register and offer health checks to improve outcomes for this patient group.

Read the full report here.

 

What are your experiences receiving acute hospital care living in West Berkshire? Let us know here, on facebook, twitter, email, or call us on 01635886210.

4 May 2017 GOOD RATING TO SOUTHMEAD SURGERY BY CQC

4 May 2017

Southmead Surgery provides GP services to 6600 patients in a suburban area of Slough. It is based in an area of mixed ethnicity and this is reflected in its patient list. The locality has a relatively low level of deprivation, with a higher working age population compared to the national average.

The practice has three GP partners and three salaried GPs, four female and two male. It currently has one practice nurse and one healthcare assistant. There are 11 members of administration, reception and support staff, including a practice manager. Southmead Surgery is a training practice and support qualified doctors undertaking their GP training.

Our key findings across all the areas we inspected were as follows:

  • We found evidence that improvements had been made. The practice had implemented new systems and processes to evidence these improvements. Our improved rating of good reflects the positive development of leadership and management systems to deliver significant progress in improving services across the board for all patient groups.
  • There was an open and transparent approach to safety and a system in place for reporting and recording significant events.
  • The practice had clearly defined and embedded systems to minimise risks to patient safety.
  • Staff were aware of current evidence based guidance. Staff had been trained with the skills and knowledge to deliver effective care and treatment.
  • Results from the national GP patient survey showed patients were treated with compassion, dignity and respect and were involved in their care and decisions about their treatment.
  • Information about services and how to complain was available. Improvements were made to the quality of care as a result of complaints and concerns.
  • Patients we spoke with said they found it easy to make an appointment with a named GP and there was continuity of care, with urgent appointments available the same day.
  • The practice had good facilities and was well equipped to treat patients and meet their needs.
  • There was a clear leadership structure and staff felt supported by management. The practice proactively sought feedback from staff and patients, which it acted on.
  • The provider was aware of the requirements of the duty of candour. Examples we reviewed showed the practice complied with these requirements.
  • Southmead Surgery has made significant improvements following the last inspection. The practice should continue to sustain these and ensure further continuous improvements are identified through their governance processes.

In addition to pre-bookable appointments that could be booked up to four weeks in advance, urgent appointments were also available for people that needed them.

Southmead Surgery is registered to provide services from the following location:

Blackpond Lane, Farnham Common, Slough, Berkshire, SL2 3ER.

Read the full report here. What are your experiences receiving acute hospital care living in West Berkshire? Let us know here, on facebook, twitter, email, or call us on 01635886210.

CQC report of The John Redcliff Hospital

9 May 2017

CQC has carried out an inspection of  The John Radcliffe Hospital on 11 and 12 October 2016: Here is the summary of the report.

The John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford is the largest hospital in the Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, with 832 beds, and serves a population of around 655,000 people. It provides acute medical and surgical services, trauma, and intensive care and offers specialist and general clinical services to the people of Oxfordshire. The John Radcliffe Hospital site includes the Children’s Hospital, Oxford Eye Hospital, Oxford Heart Centre, Women’s Centre, Neurosciences Centre, Medical Emergency Unit, Surgical Emergency Unit, and West Wing. It is Oxfordshire’s main accident and emergency (ED) site. The trust provides 90 specialist services and is the lead hospital in regional networks for trauma; vascular surgery; neonatal intensive care; primary coronary intervention and stroke.

Report overview:

Safety: Requires improvement

effectiveness: Good

Caring: Good

Responsiveness: Requires improvement

Well-led: Good

Read Full report here

What are your experiences receiving acute hospital care living in West Berkshire? Let us know here, on facebook, twitter, email, or call us on 01635886210.

 

 

28 March 2017- Hazel View residential care home

Reported: 20 April 2017

This was an unannounced inspection which took place on 28 March 2017.

Hazel View is a residential care home which is registered to provide a service for up to five people with learning disabilities. Some people had other associated difficulties including needing support with behaviours which could be distressing and/or harmful. There were five people living there on the day of the visit. The service offers accommodation in a domestic sized house, over two floors. The home is one of eight houses in a small community provided by Purley Park Trust Limited.

At the last inspection the service was rated Good. At this inspection we found the service remained Good.

Why the service is rated Good:

There is a registered manager running the service. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

The service was safe, improvements had been made since the last inspection. Staff who had been trained in safeguarding vulnerable adults and health and safety policies and procedures kept people as safe as possible. Staff understood how to protect people and followed the relevant procedures. General risks and risks to individuals were identified and action was taken to reduce them.

People’s needs were met and they were supported safely by adequate numbers of staff. The service made sure, that as far as possible, staff were recruited safely and were suitable to work with the people who live in the home. People were given their medicines appropriately, at the right times and in the right amounts by trained and competent staff.

The service remained effective. People’s health and well-being needs were met by staff who were well trained and responded effectively to people’s current and changing needs. The service sought advice from and worked with health and other professionals to ensure they met people’s health and well-being needs.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff support them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service support this practice.

The service continued to be caring and responsive. The staff team were committed and provided care with kindness and respect. Care staff were attentive, responsive and knowledgeable about the needs of individuals. Individualised care planning ensured people’s equality and diversity was respected. People were provided with activities, according to their needs, abilities and preferences.

The registered manager was highly thought of by people who use the service and the staff Team. She was described as approachable and supportive. The quality of care the service provided was assessed, reviewed and improved, as necessary.

Click here to read full report.

March 2017 – Alice Bye Court

March 2017 – Alice Bye Court

This inspection took place on 13 February 2017 and was announced.

Allied Healthcare Alice Bye Court provides domiciliary care visits and emergency alarm response in an extra-care housing scheme operated by a housing association. A staff team are based on-site 24 hours a day. The service is able to offer support to 52 flats, but currently supports 35 people in 35 flats.

The service is required to have a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run. There is a registered manager running the service.

People and staff were kept as safe as possible form any form of abuse or harm. People were protected by staff who had received the appropriate training and knew how to recognise and deal with any form of abuse or risk of harm. Staff had been recruited as safely as possible and were consequently judged to be suitable to provide people with safe care. People were supported, by trained staff, to take their medicines safely, if necessary. Individual and generic risks were identified and managed to ensure people and staff were as safe as possible when being provided with or providing care.

People’s rights were protected by staff who understood the Mental Capacity Act (2005). The Mental Capacity Act 2005 legislation provides a legal framework that sets out how to act to support people who do not have capacity to make a specific decision. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible, the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

People were provided with person centred care. Individual’s specific needs were met by a well-trained staff team. People were supported to maintain and regain as much independence as possible. People’s diversity was recognised and they were treated with respect and dignity at all times.

The service was effectively managed by team who were described as approachable, open and supportive. The quality of care offered by the service was monitored and assessed and actions were taken to make necessary improvements.

March 2017 – Allied Health Care

March 2017 –  Allied Health Care

This was the first inspection of this service which took place on 20 February 2017 and was announced.
Allied Healthcare Newbury is a domiciliary care agency which offers support to people in their own homes. The service supports approximately 84 people with diverse needs who live in the community. Services offered include a wide variety of support packages, including clinical care packages commissioned by the Care Commissioning Group and Continuing Healthcare.

The service is required to have a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run. There is a registered manager running the service.

The safety of people, staff and others safety was taken seriously. They were kept as safe as possible by staff who were trained in and followed health and safety and safeguarding procedures. They knew how to recognise and deal with abuse or risk of harm. Significant risks were identified and managed to reduce them, as much as possible. The service operated a robust recruitment procedure which checked that staff were safe and suitable to provide people with care. If people needed support to take their medicine, the service made sure care staff did this safely.

People’s right to make decisions and choices for themselves was upheld by staff. Care staff understood how important it was to people to give their consent and direct their own life. People’s capacity to make decisions was recorded, if appropriate and necessary. Relevant paperwork was, included in care plans. People’s rights were protected by staff who understood the Mental Capacity Act (2005). This legislation provides a legal framework that sets out how to act to support people who do not have capacity to make a specific decision. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible. The policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

People were treated with respect and care and staff understood how important it was to maintain people’s privacy and dignity. Care staff made sure they provided people with care that met their individual needs, preferences and choices. People’s diversity was understood and people’s care reflected any special needs they may have had.

The service was well-led by a registered manager who was experienced and supported her staff team. She and her management team were described as open, approachable and very supportive by care staff. The service monitored and reviewed the quality of care they offered. Actions were taken to ensure the quality of care was maintained and improved and any necessary developments were made in a timely way.

Feb 2017 – Holly Grange Residential Home

Feb 2017 – Holly Grange Residential Home

Last updated 3 February 2017
We carried out this inspection under Section 60 of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 as part of our regulatory functions. This inspection was planned to check whether the provider is meeting the legal requirements and regulations associated with the Health and Social Care Act 2008, to look at the overall quality of the service, and to provide a rating for the service under the Care Act 2014.We last inspected the service on 14, 15 and 24 March 2016. At that inspection we found the service was in breach of eight regulations. The service was rated ‘inadequate’ and issued with ‘warning notices’ against some of the breaches. The service was placed in ‘Special measures’ which meant it was subject to ongoing monitoring to ensure improvements were made.As part of this process a focused inspection took place on 11 August 2016 to ensure the requirements of the three warning notices had been met. We found the registered manager had taken, or was in the process of taking, action to address all of the areas identified within the warning notices.This inspection, carried out on 8 and 9 December 2016, was a comprehensive inspection to follow up all of the previously identified breaches of regulations and make a judgement about the overall compliance of the service. This inspection was also to assess whether the service could come out of ‘special measures’. We found the service had continued to make significant progress in addressing the previous areas of concern. However, some areas still required further improvement and it was too soon to be sure that all of the initial improvements would be sustained.Before the inspection, the provider completed a Provider Information Return (PIR). This is a form that asks the provider to give some key information about the service, what the service does well and improvements they plan to make. We looked at the information provided in the PIR and used this to help plan the inspection. Prior to the inspection we reviewed the records we held about the service, including the details of any safeguarding events and statutory notifications sent by the provider. Statutory notifications are reports of events that the provider is required by law to inform us about.

During the inspection we spoke with three people and three relatives about their experience of the service. We observed the interactions between people and staff and saw how staff provided people’s support. We had lunch with people on the first day of the inspection. We spoke with three of the staff and the registered manager. Prior to the inspection we contacted the local authority to seek their views. They raised no new concerns about the service.

We reviewed the care plans and associated records for three people, including their risk assessments and reviews, and related this to the care we observed. We examined a sample of other records to do with the home’s operation including staff recruitment, supervision and support records, surveys and various monitoring and audit tools.